Has the lastest mumble rap jingle annoyed you for the last time? Do the skinny pants wearing rapper give you nightmares at night? Are you only in your mid-30s and already feel out of touch with what your local radio station is playing? Well, fear not because these 3 latest albums are a testament that quality music does exist and Hip Hop did not die back in 1998.

Talib Kweli “Radio Silence”

Brooklyn veteran MC Talib Kweli has been consistently delivering overlooked albums for more than a decade. Talib Kweli’s latest “Radio Silence” raises his artistry to iconic status. As always Talib Kweli lyrically brings his conversational wordplay style that is well-matched with quality production. EX: “She’s My Hero” “Knockturnal” and “The One I Love.” The album is Hip Hop soul music for the mind that addresses to current cultural and political climate of today.  A high point is Talib Kweli’s unlikely team-up with Rick Ross on “Heads Up Eyes Open” that on paper looks out of place like a Vegan at meat festival, however; the conscious flow and street rap blend to create a record that sounds like a street church anthem. The album does take a quick downfall with the overreached track “Chips ft. Waka Flocka.” The struggle crunk nails-on-a-chalkboard rap delivered by Waka Flocka is too annoying to give the song a second listen. Overall, Radio Silence is a positive theme driven album without being preachy for the mature Hip Hop fan. 

Highlight

Chyi The Prynce “No Dope On Sundays”

Fans have been waiting patiently for an official release from Cyhi The Prynce who has been releasing credible mixtapes and co-writing with Kanye West for nearly a decade. “No Dope On Sundays” is the Georgia MC’s chance to prove that his work was worth the wait. Rhyme-wise CyHi The Prynce flow is rapid fire-like with the limited use of metaphors but direct punchlines that are expressed with passionate delivery. CyHi does a solid job retelling stories of his street hustler past while giving warnings to those who may be tempted to follow the same path. The album’s production beats overall are solid with a few tracks reminiscent of a  90s era type vibe. EX: “Get Yo Money” and “Movin Around ft Schoolboy Q.” The album in it’s entirety is more a continuation of CyHi The Prynce’s past mixtapes versus being an elevation from them. As an MC CyHi The Prynce attacks every song like an aggressive battle rather than adjusting or allowing his mic approach to be versatile for each song. After a long wait “No Dope On Sundays” is not an out-the-gate masterpiece that will be talked about for years but instead should be received as a dope album to enjoy for the moment. 

Highlight:

Fabolous and Jadakiss “Friday On Elm Street”

One day two Hip Hop living legends decided to team-up and drop an album filled with lyrical bars that will make Dylan jealous. Kiss and Fab both lyrically bring their A-game to “Friday On Elm Street” leaving the “who spit better” debate up for the fans to decide. For anyone to expect the album to sound like two old ass rappers spitting complex rhymes that would confuse a mumble rap fan is mistaken. Both Fabolous and Jadakiss take their time to create a quality mature album for the culture. The album(once was meant to be a mixtape) speaks on subject matter from a conscious perspective on topics like racism and greed with solid storytelling. EX: “Talk About it” ‘Principles” and “Soul Food.” Both MC’s deserve much credit for creating a noteworthy album that is expressed with veteran appeal matched with a fresh sound.

J.Hall

@jhallradio

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